American Coronary heart Affiliation hooks up native library-card holders with blood-pressure screens – Pasadena Star Information

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The American Heart Association hosted an event at the Altadena Library on Tuesday, May 24, where they announced their new program to make blood pressure monitors available for home use in libraries.

The program was established in partnership with the Altadena Library and the Bob Lucas Library AltadenaLa Pintoresca Branch Library in Pasadena and Hastings Branch Library in pasadena.

There are plans to expand to other libraries throughout LA County.

  • Karen Guzman-Dunn, a community visiting nurse at Huntington Health, conducts blood pressure screenings at the Altadena Library Tuesday, May 24, 2022 as the American Heart Association rolls out its free blood pressure screening kits in libraries. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • Kristine Kelly of The American Heart Association demonstrates her blood pressure screening kits available for loan at the Altadena Library on Tuesday, May 24, 2022. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

  • American Heart Association's Kristine Kelly Visits With Stroke...

    Kristine Kelly of the American Heart Association visits stroke survivor Richard Horton, 66, at the Altadena Library Tuesday, May 24, 2022 as the American Heart Association checks out their free blood pressure screening kits in libraries. Horton, who suffered two strokes at age 55 after being told his high blood pressure was normal for an African American man, feels let down by the insurance industry, even as an insurance broker. (Photo by Sarah Reingewirtz, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)

This will be like borrowing a book. Library card holders can take home a blood pressure kit that includes a blood pressure cuff, instructions, and educational materials.

The kit is provided by the AHA, which offers free monthly blood pressure screenings at the Altadena Library, courtesy of Huntington Health.

Nearly half of US adults have high blood pressure and about a third are unaware of it, according to the AHA, which also notes that people with high blood pressure are at greater risk of serious complications COVID-19.

Richard Horton of Pasadena, a double stroke survivor, was in attendance Tuesday. He spoke about the aftermath.

“I couldn’t walk, I couldn’t speak, I couldn’t use my arm, couldn’t do much,” he said. “But the reality is I’m better now. I’m not where I should be, but at the same time I’m better now.

“And that was the result of my uncontrolled, uncontrolled high blood pressure. And I would say to anyone willing to listen that knowing your baseline blood pressure is imperative for you.”

Horton said his two strokes were in 2011 and his blood pressure was 220 over 124 at the time. An excellent blood pressure reading is at or below 120 over 80.