Lincoln and Abel Moss climbing Snowdon for Parkinson’s UK

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TWO primary school brothers from Highbridge climb the highest mountain in Wales this month in aid of Parkinson UK.

Lincoln, seven, and Abel Moss, five, have already raised £1,162 for the charity they were inspired to support by their great-grandmother.

The boys, who climbed Pen y Fan in the Brecon Beacons in March, are hoping to attract more sponsors and raise awareness of the condition during Parkinson’s Awareness Month.

Her “big nanny” was diagnosed with Parkinson’s 20 years ago and is living in a local care home after suffering from Parkinson’s-related dementia.

Lincoln said: “We want to help Parkinson UK by climbing the mountains because we want to help our nanny.

“It makes me nervous, tired but good on the inside and it will be worth it.”

Abel said: “It makes me happy to help people. It’s nice to help people. People are struggling with Parkinson’s and we really need to help them.”

There is currently no cure for Parkinson’s, the world’s fastest growing neurological disease, which affects around 145,000 people in the UK.

The boys’ mother, Jodie Moss, said: “We are so proud of the boys for doing so well in running and fundraising while also helping to transform the lives of people like their great-grandmother.

“The boys made it to the top of Pen y Fan despite the freezing cold weather – they were amazing. Now they look forward to conquering Snowdon.”

She added: “The boys are delighted to have raised so much money for Parkinson’s UK and a cause so close to our family. It feels wonderful to give back to a charity that is so special to us.”

Melissa Rankin, Parkinson’s UK Regional Fundraiser for the South West said: “We would like to say a big thank you to Lincoln and Abel for taking on this incredible challenge for Parkinson’s UK – we wish them the best of luck.

“With more than 40 possible symptoms, Parkinson’s can be life-destroying. We have made major breakthroughs over the past 50 years, but there is still no cure and current treatments are not good enough.

“Fundraisers like Lincoln and Abel help us advance the research we need and fund critical support to help people with Parkinson’s live well.”

To support the boys, click HERE.