Paralysed man units new world file after climbing greater than 1,000 steps

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A father of three who is paralyzed from the waist down has set a Guinness World Record after using an exoskeleton to climb to the top of one of Britain’s tallest buildings.

Simon Kindleysides, 37, from Norwich, was unable to walk unaided after being diagnosed with functional neurological disorder (FND) and a benign glioma brain tumor in 2013.

The tumor is still growing, affecting his hearing, balance and left body coordination.

In his world record in March, he climbed 1,444 steps in the Leadenhall Building, also known as the Cheese Grater, one of the tallest buildings in London.

Simon now holds the Guinness World Record for the most stairs climbed by a man in a robotic treadmill in 8 hours.

Simon Kindleysides, 37, of Norwich, was unable to walk unaided after being diagnosed with functional neurological disorder (FND) and a benign glioma brain tumor in 2013. Pictured is Simon before his diagnosis (right) and after climbing the Cheesegrater (left)

In his world-record-breaking feat in March, he climbed 1,444 steps in the Leadenhall Building, also known as the Cheese Grater, one of the tallest buildings in London

In his world-record-breaking feat in March, he climbed 1,444 steps in the Leadenhall Building, also known as the Cheese Grater, one of the tallest buildings in London

Simon, pictured in 2021, uses a wheelchair and an exoskeleton suit.  He uses the suit for challenges, climbing stairs and going outside

Simon, pictured in 2021, uses a wheelchair and an exoskeleton suit. He uses the suit for challenges, climbing stairs and going outside

The exoskeleton suit provides motorized hip and knee movement to enable people with spinal cord injuries to stand upright, walk, roll over, and climb and descend stairs.

It took Mr Kindleysides just over six hours to get from the basement to the 51st floor of the building and he was assisted by a team of friends as well as those from CC Land who own the building.

He accomplished the feat of raising money for The Brain Tumor Charity and TeiganSmile, a campaign that supports ongoing care for children with cerebral palsy.

The father-of-three used only one wheelchair until 2015, when heartwarming footage captured at the PhysioFunction center in Northamptonshire, UK, shows him taking his first tentative steps wearing the ‘Rex’ robotic suit.

Then, in 2017, he found the ReWalk suit, which allowed him to climb stairs and go outside.

And he’s since met challenges, first with suits on loan and then a £100,000 Re-Walk exoskeleton suit he received from an anonymous donor in 2019.

Mr Kindleysides, who also faces mental health issues including depression, hopes his challenge will show others what is possible with a positive attitude and determination.

It took Mr Kindleysides just over six hours to get from the basement to the 51st floor of the building and he was helped by a team of friends (pictured) as well as those from CC Land, who own the building

It took Mr Kindleysides just over six hours to get from the basement to the 51st floor of the building and he was helped by a team of friends (pictured) as well as those from CC Land, who own the building

He said: “The marathon showed me that I could go the distance, so I wanted to climb a climb for my next challenge. I’ve called all of London’s tallest skyscrapers and the Cheesegrater was the one who got back to me – I couldn’t have asked for a better place.’

Adam Goldin, Head of CC Land UK, said: “It is an honor that Simon has chosen to climb the Leadenhall Building. Giving back is an important part of our philosophy and we support charitable initiatives whenever possible.

‘We are delighted to be part of Simon’s world record attempts and wish him every success in the future.’

Mr Kindleysides, who also faces mental health issues including depression, hopes his challenge will show others what is possible with a positive attitude and determination

Mr Kindleysides, who also faces mental health issues including depression, hopes his challenge will show others what is possible with a positive attitude and determination

It is not the first challenge Mr Kindleysides has taken on.

The 37-year-old, who is the father of Anya, 17, Corin, 10, and Lyra, 4, ran 125 miles in February 2021 and has collected more than £12,000.

This was donated to the Norfolk and Norwich Hospitals Charity for the children’s operating room and intensive care unit.

A documentary about the life of Mr Kindleyside called ‘No Limits – The Robotic Man’ was also released in 2021.

Simon went from Blofield to Brundal in Norfolk in 2021 with a ReWalk exoskeleton

Simon went from Blofield to Brundal in Norfolk in 2021 with a ReWalk exoskeleton

And in 2018, Mr Kindleysides set another world record when he completed the London Marathon in 36 hours and 46 minutes and became the fastest man ever to run 26.2 miles in a robotic running suit.

In October this year he will compete again in the London Marathon to beat his time.

You can donate to Mr Kindleyside’s fundraiser for The Brain Tumor Charity and TeiganSmiles here.

What is a ReWalk exoskeleton suit?

The ReWalk is a wearable robotic exoskeleton that enables hip and knee movements to enable people with spinal cord injuries to stand upright, walk, turn, climb stairs, and descend. The system enables independent, controlled walking and mimics the natural gait pattern of the legs.

Who can benefit?

ReWalk is intended for use by people with lower limb disabilities whose hands and shoulders can use crutches or a walker. Height between 160cm – 190cm (5’3″ to 6’2″) and weight requirement up to 100kg (220lbs).

It has shown good results in the following:

Reducing fatigue and improving sleep patterns

reduction in pain

Improve bowel and bladder function

reduction in swelling

preservation of bone mass

Improved balance while seated

Source: Hobbs Rehabilitation