Preparation is vital to staying secure whereas recreating open air throughout winter

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IDAHO – The Idaho hinterland offers unlimited recreational opportunities even during the winter months. Snowshoeing, cross-country skiing, and snowmobiling are popular outdoor winter activities in Idaho, and a great place to do so are the four Park-n-Ski locations for all skill levels.

“One is called Whoop ’em up, Gold Fork, Beaver Creek Summit, and Banner Ridge. They’re all between Lowman and Morris Creek Summit, “said Tom Helmer, Idaho Department Parks and Recreation Manager for non-motorized trails coming from these locations. Some of the trails are groomed but not groomed.”

Given the snow and colder temperatures, Helmer said, preparation is key to safety.

“Make a plan and make sure someone knows what the plan is. So if you say you go snowshoeing in the Payette National Forest, for example, make sure someone knows when you will be back, “he” So if you are late or don’t come back that day, they can contact the sheriff or contact whoever if something happened. “

You can also check the road conditions by calling 511 before you set off.

“Make sure you have your equipment and that it’s accessible and operational, especially when you’re off-road in avalanche sites, Idaho Department Parks and Recreation, public information specialist, said,” You want to make sure you have extra water and have snacks and are properly dressed. “

When you are on the trails, make sure that you follow the rule of “leaving no trace” and be respectful of other people seeking relaxation.

“There is a different kind of etiquette for walking the trails in snow,” said Chambers. “A lot of them are groomed for cross-country skiing so they have the skating ski tracks and then they are groomed for snowshoeing too. And follow the signs.”

Idaho Parks and Recreation offers free avalanche safety courses nationwide, for more information click here.

To find activities near you, click here.

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