Rotary Park summer season camps wrap up, spur out of doors curiosity

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Montgomery County Government

Aug 3, 2022 2:01 p.m

CLARKSVILLE, TN — Montgomery County Parks and Recreation completed the last of seven full-week summer camps on July 29 at Rotary Park. This year, County Parks hosted camps for a total of 95 students each week. The first six sessions were for campers aged 8-11 and the seventh session for campers aged 12-14.

Katherine Netti, Certified Instructor and Natural Resources and Programs Manager, led the camp. Before joining Montgomery County Parks and Recreation, Netti was a high school art teacher in the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System. She planned lessons with a dynamic, hands-on curriculum to build an experience titled “A Day in the Life of a Field Biologist.”

Campers worked with tools such as field guides, magnifying glasses, binoculars and digital microscopes to identify and record the specimens they found.

” data-medium-file=”https://clarksvillenow.sagacom.com/files/2022/08/thumbnail_park-2-640×480.jpg” data-large-file=”https://clarksvillenow.sagacom.com/files /2022/08/thumbnail_park-2-1200×768.jpg” loading=”lazy” class=”wp-image-403500 size-full” src=”https://clarksvillenow.com/files/2022/08/thumbnail_park-2 .jpg” alt=”” width=”1280″ height=”960″ srcset=”https://clarksvillenow.com/files/2022/08/thumbnail_park-2.jpg 1280w, https://clarksvillenow.com/files /2022/08/thumbnail_park-2-640×480.jpg 640w, https://clarksvillenow.com/files/2022/08/thumbnail_park-2-768×576.jpg 768w, https://clarksvillenow.com/files/2022/08 /thumbnail_park-2-340×255.jpg 340w” size=”(max-width: 1280px) 100vw, 1280px”/>The campers worked with tools such as field guides, magnifying glasses, binoculars and digital microscopes to identify and record the specimens they found.

“Every day of the week we had a different species focus; Plants, rocks, animals, insects and fish. We started the day by writing the definition of our daily scientist, and then went out into the field or on a hike to collect samples. I really enjoyed working with the children. I think they had a great time while learning about the environment,” Netti said.

Campers worked with tools such as field guides, magnifying glasses, binoculars and digital microscopes to identify and record the specimens they found. Campers kept a nature journal to log locations, finds, and other notes. They broke geodes in the creek, saw a barred owl on a birding hike, and claimed to have caught the largest stag beetle they had ever seen. Netti hopes the camps will encourage conservation ideas, curiosity and a lifelong respect for wildlife.

“In 2021, after COVID-19, we were able to host two camps. Going from two to seven camps is a dream for us. We look forward to making even more of an impact in the future. Children love summer for many different reasons, and we want those reasons to include a healthy appreciation for the outdoors,” said Sally Burchett, Parks and Recreation Director.

“When we built the Wade Bourne Nature Center, we envisioned these types of activities to honor Wade and his lifelong passion for conservation,” said Montgomery County Mayor Jim Durrett.

If you are interested in registering your child or children for the 2023 Rotary Park Nature Camp, email Katherine Netti @ [email protected]