Sacramento officers request tenting ordinance buffer modification

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>> THE IMMEDIATE ACTION IS TO AMEND AN REGULATION THAT PROHIBITED CAMPING AND FLAPS. DAYS AFTER TWO ORDERS BANING CAMPING IN THE CITY OF SACRAMENTO. >> IN RESPONSE TO WHAT IS HAPPENING IN OUR CITY, WE MUST PROTECT THE SAFETY OF CHILDREN AND MAKE THEM A PRIORITY >> VICE MAYOR ANGELIQUE ASHBY AND COUNCIL MEMBER JEFF HARRIS DEMAND CHANGING THE CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE ORDER OF SACRAMENTO TO BY ONE 500 FEET -INCLUDE BUFFER AROUND SCHOOLS AND KITAS. >> WE NEED TO STRENGTHEN IT AND SAY SOME BEHAVIOR IS UNACCEPTABLE >> STEPHANIE CROWE, A LONG TIME RESIDENTS OF DOWNTOWN SACRAMENTO, SAYS THIS IS A GOOD START. >> I WOULD SAY YOU SHOULD HAVE A LARGER SECURITY ZONE. 500 FEET DON’T REALLY DO IT FOR ME. >> BUT HOPES TIGHTER REGULATIONS WILL HELP PROTECT RESIDENTS AND CHILDREN WALKING TO SCHOOL. >> WE NEED TO KEEP SCHOOLS AS SAFE AS POSSIBLE. DEALING WITH HOMELESSNESS IS A VERSATILE APPROACH. >> ASHBY ALSO STRESSED THE NEED FOR MORE HOUSING AND MENTAL HEALTH, DRUG ADDICTION AND TRAUMA SERVICES. >> WHEN QUESTIONED ON HOW SOON THIS REGULATION MAY BE CHANGED THE MEMBERS OF THE COUNCIL HAD THEY HOPE TO MAKE IT AT THE NEXT COUNCIL MEETING

Sacramento officials eye school, daycare safety when applying for camping ordinance change

Updated: 11:26 PM PDT Sep 27, 2022

Days after two Sacramento County no-camping ordinances went into effect, Vice Mayor Angelique Ashby and Councilman Jeff Harris are calling for a 500-foot buffer around all schools, daycares and child care centers. This motion to amend the Critical Infrastructure Ordinance comes amid stressed concerns from several local residents after a homeless man molested middle school students last week. The ordinance went into effect September 30 and prohibits camping or camps in the following areas: In, on, or within 25 feet of critical infrastructure or the entrance/exit of critical infrastructure. Up to 1,000 feet from a place that provides year-round lodging for people affected by homelessness and the entrance/egress to such places. Within or within 30 feet of wildfire and flood prone areas during severe weather. Within 25 feet of a youth welfare facility, public or private elementary or secondary schools, and public libraries. As they are asking for an existing regulation to be changed, the change would be immediate, but they need the support of other councillors. KCRA 3 asked who would enforce the change and if there were enough staff to handle it. Do we have enough local people to protect schools? Probably in a phased approach, yes. Can we implement everything within the Critical Infrastructure Regulation? no Not all at once, we don’t have the staff for that,” Ashby said at a media conference. But some Sacramento residents say they need help keeping public sidewalks clear and want ordinances enforced. Stephanie Crow said she took her kids to school for years, but now bought another car so she could drive her seventh-grade daughter to school. She attributes this to a lack of security. “We don’t have the perfect plan. There are a lot of different things that are bigger than me. Personally, I think we should go out there and try to help,” added Crow. While Ashby and Harris hope they can get assistance from county officials, including the Sacramento County Office of Emergency Services, they say they would be willing to involve the Sacramento Police Department if that doesn’t happen. The Critical Infrastructure Ordinance includes an offense for those who fail to comply with sidewalk clearance, although city officials have assured this is aimed at reaching various services. Ashby said this would be heard during the city’s next council meeting on October 11. The Sacramento County Board also passed a separate ordinance dealing with the Dry Creek and American River Parkway. Some of the key provisions of the ordinance are: Prohibition of camping or constructing, maintaining or occupying any building or campground facility on American River Parkway or Dry Creek Parkway except with the written permission of the director. Prohibiting altering the park grounds or accumulating furniture, household items, or other items to create a structure. Prohibit use or maintenance of any combustible or combustible liquid container or generator unless a permit has been obtained from the Regional Parks Director granted.

Days after two Sacramento County no-camping ordinances went into effect, Vice Mayor Angelique Ashby and Councilman Jeff Harris are calling for a 500-foot buffer around all schools, daycares and child care centers.

This motion to amend the Critical Infrastructure Ordinance comes amid stressed concerns from several local residents after a homeless man molested middle school students last week.

The regulation came into effect on September 30 and prohibits camping or camps in the following areas:

  • In, on, or within 25 feet of critical infrastructure or the entry/exit of critical infrastructure.
  • Up to 1,000 feet of a location that provides year-round lodging and entry/egress to those affected by homelessness.
  • Within or within 30 feet of areas at risk of wildfires and flooding during severe weather.
  • Within 25 feet of a youth welfare facility, public or private elementary or secondary schools, and public libraries.

As they are asking for an existing regulation to be changed, the change would be immediate, but they need the support of other councillors.

KCRA 3 asked who would enforce the change and if there were enough staff to process it.

“Do we have enough local people to protect schools? Probably in a phased approach, yes. Can we implement everything within the Critical Infrastructure Regulation? no Not all at once, we don’t have the staff for that,” Ashby said at a media conference.

But some Sacramento residents say they need help keeping public sidewalks clear and want ordinances enforced.

Stephanie Crow said she took her kids to school for years but has now bought another car so she can drive her seventh grade daughter to school. She attributes this to a lack of security.

“We don’t have the perfect plan. There are many different things that are bigger than me. Personally, I think we should go out there and try to help,” Crow added.

While Ashby and Harris hope they can get assistance from county officials, including the Sacramento County Office of Emergency Services, they say they would be willing to involve the Sacramento Police Department if that doesn’t happen.

The Critical Infrastructure Ordinance provides an administrative offense for those who fail to comply with clearing sidewalks, although city officials have assured this is aimed at reaching various services.

Ashby said this would be heard during the city’s next council meeting on October 11.

The Sacramento County Board also passed a separate ordinance dealing with the Dry Creek and American River Parkway.

Some of the key provisions of the regulation are:

  • Prohibition of camping or constructing, maintaining or occupying any building or campground facility on American River Parkway or Dry Creek Parkway except with the written permission of the director.
  • Prohibition on altering the park facilities or accumulating furniture, household items or other items to create structure.
  • Prohibits the use or maintenance of any flammable or combustible liquid container or generator unless authorized by the Director of the Regional Park.